ECOLOGICAL AND BIOLOGICAL INTERACTIONS BETWEEN SPOTTED LANTERNFLY AND HOST TREES IN THE LANDSCAPE

  • Hoover, Ke. K. (PI)

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

Spotted lanternfly (SLF) is an introduced, phoem-feeding invasive insect from Asia that threatens numerous specialty crops (including grapes, stone fruits, hops, and ornamentals) in PA and other parts of the Northeast and mid-Atlantic. Basic information is lacking on SLF biology and ecology, making containment and control difficult. We will fill knowledge gaps to determine which host plants can support development of each life stage of SLF and how far each instar can disperse in various landscapes. A critical issue is to determine definitively if SLF requires Ailanthus altissima to reproduce and, if not, if the absence of Ailanthus reduces SLF fitness. Knowledge of how SLF feeding afffects sugar metabolosm in A. altissima compared with other preferred host tree species may provide clues as to why this tree is preferred (or required) by this pest. Impacts of SLF on tree physiology at different levels of pest pressure will also contribute to our ability to predict at what densities it may have long-term effects on tree health. We will also develop sampling methods to estimate population abundance and distribution of SLF, which will facilitate directing and assessing the efficacy of control efforts. Currently, sampling methods can do little more than provide presence/absence information. Having methods to sample key life stages of SLF to estimate population abundance and dispersion is essential for eventual implementation of IPM programs and setting program goals for containment.

StatusActive
Effective start/end date3/7/209/30/24

Funding

  • National Institute of Food and Agriculture

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