A comparative analysis of the Late Woodland-Early Mississippian settlement landscape in Northern Georgia

Jennifer Birch, Jacob Lulewicz, Abigail Rowe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

To understand the development of complex socio-political phenomena, we need to study not just the origins of central places, but also their emergence. This can be accomplished by taking an historical perspective where we position ourselves before the occurrence we wish to study. Data from the Georgia Archaeological Site File are presented to explore the Late Woodland and Early Mississippian (ca. A.D. 600-1,100) settlement landscape which contextualized the emergence of two prominent Mississippian mound centers: Macon Plateau (also known as Ocmulgee) and Etowah. Our results suggest that the Etowah River valley supported a denser population who had formed attachments to particular points in the landscape compared to the region surrounding Macon Plateau during the Late Woodland to Early Mississippian transition. These social landscapes provided different contexts for the origins of each Mississippian center and influenced later trajectories of cultural development and settlement in each region.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-133
Number of pages19
JournalSoutheastern Archaeology
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Archaeology

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