A longitudinal evaluation of prevalent negative beliefs about residential placement for troubled adolescents

Patrick C. Friman, D. Wayne Osgood, Gail Smith, Dave Shanahan, Ronald W. Thompson, Robert Larzelere, Daniel L. Daly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

To investigate the validity of five prevalent negative beliefs about residential placement, we followed adolescents from a residential program and a comparison group at 3-month intervals for 4 to 8 years. This residential program in the Midwest uses the Teaching-Family Model in which six to eight adolescents live in a family-style environment. The interviews included five scales reflecting youths' views about important aspects of their lives in placement: (1) Delivery of Helpful Treatment, (2) Satisfaction with Supervising Adults, (3) Isolation from Family, (4) Isolation from Friends, and (5) Sense of Personal Control. Hierarchical linear modeling allowed us to estimate group differences while controlling for developmental trends, demographic factors, and prior differences between groups. The two groups were equivalent on all scales before the study. During the following placement, however, the treatment group's ratings were significantly more positive than the comparison group on four of the five scales and approached significance on the fifth. These findings suggest that negative beliefs about life in residential placement for adolescents may not apply to all programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-324
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A longitudinal evaluation of prevalent negative beliefs about residential placement for troubled adolescents'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this