A meta-analysis of the association between insomnia with objective short sleep duration and risk of hypertension

Yanyuan Dai, Alexandros N. Vgontzas, Le Chen, Dandan Zheng, Baixin Chen, Julio Fernandez-Mendoza, Maria Karataraki, Xiangdong Tang, Yun Li

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this meta-analysis was to examine the association between insomnia with objective short sleep duration (ISSD) with prevalent and incident hypertension in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies, respectively. Data were collected from 6 cross-sectional studies with 5914 participants and 2 longitudinal studies with 1963 participants. Odds ratios (ORs) for prevalent and risk ratios (RRs) for incident hypertension were calculated through meta-analyses of adjusted data from individual studies. Compared to normal sleepers with objective normal sleep duration (NNSD), ISSD was significantly associated with higher pooled OR for prevalent hypertension (pooled OR = 2.67, 95%CI = 1.45–4.90) and pooled RR for incident hypertension (pooled RR = 1.95, 95%CI = 1.19–3.20), respectively. Compared to insomnia with objective normal sleep duration, ISSD was associated with significantly higher pooled OR of prevalent hypertension (pooled OR = 1.94, 95%CI = 1.29–2.92) and pooled RR for incident hypertension (pooled RR = 2.07, 95%CI = 1.47–2.90), respectively. Furthermore, normal sleepers with objective short sleep duration were not associated with either prevalent (pooled OR = 1.21, 95%CI = 0.84–1.75) or incident (pooled RR = 0.97, 95%CI = 0.81–1.17) hypertension compared to NNSD. Our findings suggest that ISSD is a more severe phenotype of the disorder associated with a higher risk of hypertension. Objective short sleep duration might be a valid and clinically useful index of insomnia's impact on cardiovascular health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101914
JournalSleep Medicine Reviews
Volume75
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2024

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

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