Actin Up: An Overview of the Rac GEF Dock1/Dock180 and Its Role in Cytoskeleton Rearrangement

Emily J. Koubek, Lorraine C. Santy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Dock1, originally Dock180, was the first identified member of the Dock family of GTPase Exchange Factors. Early biochemical and genetic studies of Dock180 elucidated the functions and regulation of Dock180 and informed our understanding of all Dock family members. Dock180 activates Rac to stimulate actin polymerization in response to signals initiated by a variety of receptors. Dock180 dependent Rac activation is essential for processes such as apoptotic cell engulfment, myoblast fusion, and cell migration during development and homeostasis. Inappropriate Dock180 activity has been implicated in cancer invasion and metastasis and in the uptake of bacterial pathogens. Here, we give an overview of the history and current understanding of the activity, regulation, and impacts of Dock180.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3565
JournalCells
Volume11
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology

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