Additional Resistant Starch from One Potato Side Dish per Day Alters the Gut Microbiota but Not Fecal Short-Chain Fatty Acid Concentrations

Peter Demartino, Emily A. Johnston, Kristina S. Petersen, Penny M. Kris-Etherton, Darrell W. Cockburn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The composition of the gut microbiota and their metabolites are associated with cardiometabolic health and disease risk. Intake of dietary fibers, including resistant starch (RS), has been shown to favorably affect the health of the gut microbiome. The aim of this research was to measure changes in the gut microbiota and fecal short-chain fatty acids as part of a randomized, crossover supplemental feeding study. Fifty participants (68% female, aged 40 ± 13 years, BMI 24.5 ± 3.6 kg/m2) completed this study. Potato dishes (POT) contained more RS than refined grain dishes (REF) (POT: 1.31% wet basis (95% CI: 0.94, 1.71); REF: 0.73% wet basis (95% CI: 0.34, 1.14); p = 0.03). Overall, potato dish consumption decreased alpha diversity, but beta diversity was not impacted. Potato dish consumption was found to increase the abundance of Hungatella xylanolytica, as well as that of the butyrate producing Roseburia faecis, though fecal butyrate levels were unchanged. Intake of one potato-based side dish per day resulted in modest changes in gut microbiota composition and diversity, compared to isocaloric intake of refined grains in healthy adults. Studies examining foods naturally higher in RS are needed to understand microbiota changes in response to dietary intake of RS and associated health effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number721
JournalNutrients
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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