Adversity, engagement, and later achievement: The role of emotion regulation and parent-child relationship quality

Casey Mullins, Carlomagno C. Panlilio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Students who have experienced adversity tend to demonstrate poorer academic outcomes than their non-maltreated peers. Academic engagement, a multidimensional, motivational construct, associated with a myriad of positive academic outcomes is an important academically-related mechanism that can be leveraged to improve the outcomes of this population. Objective: The present study aimed to better understanding of how engagement develops in the context of adversity by exploring the effects emotion regulation skills and parent–child relationships have on engagement development. Participants and setting: Analyses were conducted on 795 participants in the NSCAW dataset. Methods: Path analysis was used to estimate mediation and moderated mediation models. Results: Emotion regulation skills significantly mediated the effect experiencing trauma symptoms had on engagement. Parent-child relationship quality moderated the mediation effect emotion regulation skills had on the relationship between experiencing trauma symptoms and engagement. Conclusions: Emotion regulation skills and parent–child relationship quality are potential intervention targets to improve engagement for students who have experienced adversity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number106862
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume148
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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