Anatomic distribution of renal artery stenosis in children: Implications for imaging

Nghia J. Vo, Ben D. Hammelman, Judy M. Racadio, C. Frederic Strife, Neil D. Johnson, John M. Racadio

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

70 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Renal artery stenosis (RAS) causes significant hypertension in children. Frequently, pediatric RAS occurs with systemic disorders. In these cases, stenoses are often complex and/or include long segments. We believed that hypertensive children without comorbid conditions had a different lesion distribution and that the difference might have implications for imaging and treatment. Objective: To identify locations of RAS lesions in these hypertensive children without comorbid conditions. Materials and methods: Patients who had renal angiography for hypertension from 1993 to 2005 were identified. Patients with systemic disorders, renovascular surgery, or normal angiograms were excluded. The angiograms of the remaining patients were reviewed for number, type, and location of stenoses. Results: Eighty-seven patients underwent renal angiography for hypertension; 30 were excluded for comorbid conditions. Twenty-one of the remaining 57 patients had abnormal angiograms; 24 stenoses were identified in those patients. All were focal and distributed as follows: 6 (25%) main renal artery, 12 (50%) 2nd order branch, 3 (12.5%) 3rd order branch, and 3 (12.5%) accessory renal artery. Conclusion: Hypertensive children without comorbid conditions who have RAS usually have single, focal branch artery stenoses. This distribution supports angiography in these patients because of its superior sensitivity in detecting branch vessel disease and its therapeutic role in percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1032-1036
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Radiology
Volume36
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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