Animated, video entertainment-education to improve vaccine confidence globally during the COVID-19 pandemic: an online randomized controlled experiment with 24,000 participants

Simiao Chen, Sebastian Forster, Juntao Yang, Fengyun Yu, Lirui Jiao, Jennifer Gates, Zhuoran Wang, Haitao Liu, Qiushi Chen, Pascal Geldsetzer, Peixin Wu, Chen Wang, Shannon McMahon, Till Bärnighausen, Maya Adam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Science-driven storytelling and entertainment-education (E-E) media demonstrate potential for promoting improved attitudes and behavioral intent towards health-related practices. Months after the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), emerging research highlights the essential role of interventions to improve public confidence in the COVID-19 vaccine. To improve vaccine confidence, we designed three short, animated videos employing three research-informed pedagogical strategies. These can be distributed globally through social media platforms, because of their wordless and culturally accessible design. However, the effectiveness of short, animated storytelling videos, deploying various pedagogic strategies, needs to be explored across different global regions. Methods/design: The present study is a multi-site, parallel group, randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing the effectiveness of (i) a storytelling-instructional-humor approach, (ii) a storytelling-analogy approach, (iii) a storytelling-emotion-focused approach, and (iv) no video. For our primary outcomes, we will measure vaccine hesitancy, and for secondary outcomes, we will measure behavioral intent to seek vaccination and hope. Using online platforms, we will recruit 12,000 participants (aged 18–59 years) from the USA and China, respectively, yielding a total sample size of 24,000. Discussion: This trial uses innovative online technology, reliable randomization algorithms, validated survey instruments, and list experiments to establish the effectiveness of three short, animated videos employing various research-informed pedagogical strategies. Results will be used to scientifically support the broader distribution of these short, animated video as well as informing the design of future videos for rapid, global public health communication. Trial registration: German Clinical Trials Register DRKS #00023650. Date of registration: 2021/02/09.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number161
JournalTrials
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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