Assessing the Environmental Consequences of the Generation and Alteration of Mafic Volcaniclastic Deposits During Large Igneous Province Emplacement

Benjamin Black, Tushar Mittal, Francesca Lingo, Kristina Walowski, Andres Hernandez

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Large igneous provinces (LIPs) famously host voluminous lava flows and large intrusive magma bodies that feed surface magmatism. However, they often also include substantial components of fragmental volcanic rocks. These fragmental rocks result from diverse processes including fire fountaining at fissures, phreatomagmatic interactions with subsurface fluids, and lava-water interactions. Pyroclastic fire fountaining and phreatomagmatic activity can generate buoyant eruption columns, modulating the altitude of gas injection. Both phreatomagmatic and lava-water activity can produce large volumes of permeable, glass-rich, mafic volcaniclastic material. These mafic volcaniclastic deposits (MVDs) are prone to reaction and alteration. Here, we review the role of mafic volcaniclastic rocks in LIPs, and consider the chemical fluxes and environmental consequences of mafic volcaniclastic alteration across a range of timescales. We suggest that release of phosphorus, nickel, and iron during emplacement and alteration of LIP mafic volcaniclastic deposits merits further investigation as a mechanism by which LIPs impact marine chemistry and productivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationLarge Igneous Provinces
Subtitle of host publicationA Driver of Global Environmental and Biotic Changes
Publisherwiley
Pages117-131
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9781119507444
ISBN (Print)9781119507451
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Physics and Astronomy

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