Association between Mobility Measured during Hospitalization and Functional Outcomes in Older Adults with Acute Myocardial Infarction in the SILVER-AMI Study

Alexandra M. Hajduk, Terrence E. Murphy, Mary E. Geda, John A. Dodson, Sui Tsang, Leila Haghighat, Mary E. Tinetti, Thomas M. Gill, Sarwat I. Chaudhry

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14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Importance: Many older survivors of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) experience functional decline, an outcome of primary importance to older adults. Mobility impairment has been proposed as a risk factor for functional decline but has not been evaluated to date in older patients hospitalized for AMI. Objective: To examine the association of mobility impairment, measured during hospitalization, as a risk marker for functional decline among older patients with AMI. Design, Setting, and Participants: Prospective cohort study among 94 academic and community hospitals in the United States. Participants were 2587 hospitalized patients with AMI who were 75 years or older. The study dates were January 2013 to June 2017. Main Outcomes and Measures: Mobility was evaluated during AMI hospitalization using the Timed "Up and Go," with scores categorized as preserved mobility (≤15 seconds to complete), mild impairment (>15 to ≤25 seconds to complete), moderate impairment (>25 seconds to complete), and severe impairment (unable to complete). Self-reported function in activities of daily living (ADLs) (bathing, dressing, transferring, and walking around the home) and walking 0.4 km (one-quarter mile) was assessed at baseline and 6 months after discharge. The primary outcomes were worsening of 1 or more ADLs and loss of ability to walk 0.4 km from baseline to 6 months after discharge. The association between mobility impairment and risk of functional decline was evaluated with multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. Results: Among 2587 hospitalized patients with AMI, the mean (SD) age was 81.4 (4.8) years, and 1462 (56.5%) were male. More than half of the cohort exhibited mobility impairment during AMI hospitalization (21.8% [564 of 2587] had mild impairment, 16.0% [414 of 2587] had moderate impairment, and 15.2% [391 of 2587] had severe impairment); 12.8% (332 of 2587) reported ADL decline, and 16.7% (431 of 2587) reported decline in 0.4-km mobility. Only 3.8% (30 of 800) of participants with preserved mobility experienced any ADL decline compared with 6.9% (39 of 564) of participants with mild impairment (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.24; 95% CI, 0.74-2.09), 18.6% (77 of 414) of participants with moderate impairment (aOR, 2.67; 95% CI, 1.67-4.27), and 34.7% (136 of 391) of participants with severe impairment (aOR, 5.45; 95% CI, 3.29-9.01). Eleven percent (90 of 800) of participants with preserved mobility declined in ability to walk 0.4 km compared with 15.2% (85 of 558) of participants with mild impairment (aOR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.04-2.20), 19.0% (78 of 411) of participants with moderate impairment (aOR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.37-3.02), and 24.6% (95 of 386) of participants with severe impairment (aOR, 3.25; 95% CI, 2.02-5.23). Conclusions and Relevance: This study's findings suggest that mobility impairment assessed during hospitalization may be a potent risk marker for functional decline in older survivors of AMI. These findings also suggest that brief, validated assessments of mobility should be part of the care of older hospitalized patients with AMI to identify those at risk for this important patient-centered outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1669-1677
Number of pages9
JournalJAMA Internal Medicine
Volume179
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine

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