Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome in the US: A prospective population-based analysis of patient-reported outcomes and health care utilization

Carlos A. Vaz Fragoso, Terrence E. Murphy, George O. Agogo, Heather G. Allore, Gail J. McAvay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Prior work suggests that asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) has a greater health burden than asthma alone or COPD alone. In the current study, we have further evaluated the health burden of ACOS in a nationally representative sample of the US population, focusing on patient-reported outcomes and health care utilization and on comparisons with asthma alone and COPD alone. Patient-reported outcomes are especially meaningful, as these include functional activities that are highly valued by patients and are the basis for patient-centered care. Methods: Using data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), we evaluated patient-reported outcomes and health care utilization among participants who were aged 40-85 years and had self-reported, physician-diagnosed asthma or COPD. MEPS administered five rounds of interviews, at baseline and approximately every 6 months over 2.5 years. Patient-reported outcomes included activities of daily living (ADLs), mobility, social/recreational activities, disability days in bed, and health status (Short Form 12, Version 2). Health care utilization included outpatient and emergency department (ED) visits, and hospitalization. Results: Of 3,486 participants with asthma or COPD, 1,585 (45.4%) had asthma alone, 1,294 (37.1%) had COPD alone, and 607 (17.4%) had ACOS. Relative to asthma alone, ACOS was significantly associated with higher odds of prevalent disability in ADLs and limitations in mobility and social/recreational activities (adjusted odds ratios [adjORs]: 1.91-3.98), as well as with higher odds of incident limitations in mobility and social/recreational activities, disability days in bed, and respiratory-based outpatient and ED visits, and hospitalization (adjORs: 1.86-2.35). In addition, ACOS had significantly worse physical and mental health scores than asthma alone (P-values,0.0001). Relative to COPD alone, ACOS was significantly associated with higher odds of prevalent limitations in mobility and social/recreational activities (adjORs: 1.68-2.06), as well as with higher odds of incident disability days in bed and respiratory-based outpatient and ED visits (adjORs: 1.48-1.74). In addition, ACOS had a significantly worse physical health score, but similar mental health score, as compared with COPD alone (P-values 0.0025 and 0.1578, respectively). Conclusion: In the US, ACOS is associated with a greater health burden, including patient-reported outcomes and health care utilization, relative to asthma alone and COPD alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)517-527
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of COPD
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 3 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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