Augmented T-cell mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in adults with major depressive disorder

Ann Katrin Grotle, Ashley M. Darling, Erika F. Saunders, Paul J. Fadel, Daniel W. Trott, Jody L. Greaney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) is highest in young adulthood, an effect that has been magnified by the COVID-19 pandemic. Importantly, individuals with MDD are at a greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Accumulating evidence supports immune system dysregulation as a major contributor to the elevated CVD risk in older adults with MDD; however, whether this is present in young adults with MDD without comorbid disease remains unclear. Interestingly, recent data suggest augmented T-cell mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (T-cell mitoROS) as a potent driver of immune dysregulation in animal models of psychiatric disease. With this background in mind, we tested the hypothesis that young adults with MDD would have augmented T-cell mitoROS and circulating proinflammatory cytokines compared with healthy young adults without MDD (HA). Whole blood was drawn from 14 young adults with MDD (age: 23 ± 2 yr) and 11 HA (age: 22 ± 1 yr). T-cell mitoROS (MitoSOX red; total: CD3 , T-helper: CD4 , T cytotoxic: CD8 ) and serum cytokines were assessed by flow cytometry. Total T-cell mitoROS was significantly greater in adults with MDD compared with HA [median: 14,089 arbitrary units (AU); median: 1,362 AU, P = 0.01]. Likewise, both T-helper and T-cytotoxic cell mitoROS were significantly greater in adults with MDD compared with HA (both: P < 0.05). There were no differences in circulating cytokines between groups (all cytokines: P > 0.05). Collectively, these findings suggest that elevated T-cell mitoROS may represent an early marker of immune system dysregulation in young, otherwise healthy, adults with MDD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)H568-H574
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume322
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

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