Barley Variety and Growing Location Provide Nuanced Contributions to Beer Flavor Using Elite Germplasm in Commercial-Type Malts and Beers

Campbell P. Morrissy, Margaret A. Halstead, Michael Féchir, Daniela Carrijo, Scott P. Fisk, Vern Johnson, Harmonie M. Bettenhausen, Thomas H. Shellhammer, Patrick M. Hayes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Understanding the role barley variety plays in the overall flavor profile of beer is an area of research of interest to barley breeders, maltsters, and brewers. Here we build on previous research on the effect of barley variety on beer flavor by focusing on commercial-type malts and beers. A selection of three winter-habit, elite malting lines–two released varieties and one experimental–were grown in three locations across Oregon and California and harvested in summer 2020. Each was malted to the specifications of Pilsner-style malt. Beers were produced to mimic offerings of the industry partner and utilized a small portion of specialty malt and higher hopping rates than previous work. All beers underwent descriptive sensory analysis and Projective Mapping (Napping®) to characterize and determine the magnitude of separation between samples. Malting and brewing performance differed among the nine entries, but sensory outcomes showed only minor separation and few significant differences in the descriptive analysis. The results here showed that there is correlation between malt modification and sensory outcomes and ultimately confirmed that barley variety and growing location contributes to beer flavor. However, the overall contributions are nuanced, particularly in commercial-ty3pe malts and beers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)404-415
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the American Society of Brewing Chemists
Volume81
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

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