Barriers to Care for Pregnant and Post-Partum Women Experiencing Co-Occurring Intimate Partner Violence and Opioid Use Disorder

Penelope K. Morrison, Emily Yourish, Judy C. Chang, Elizabeth Krans, Chelsea Pallatino-Trevelline

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Thecurrent manuscript explores barriers to care for pregnant and post-partum women experiencing co-occurring intimate partner violence and opioid use disorder through the lens of providers who work with this unique population. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study consisting of 49 semi-structured, open-ended interviews with service providers working across contexts (e.g., IPV, prenatal care, substance use, addiction medicine, law enforcement, criminal justice, welfare services, etc.). Results: Participants reported three main types of barriers which can impact outcomes and reduce care for pregnant and post-partum women with co-occurring IPV and OUD (Co-IPV/OUD). 1) Barriers that make it difficult for pregnant or post-partum women to seek, receive, and successfully engage in care for both IPV and OUD. Barriers that providers encounter in trying to care for and/or treat pregnant and post-partum women with Co-IPV/OUD. Lastly, barriers which present a challenge to providing comprehensive, coordinated care for pregnant or post-partum women with Co-IPV/OUD. Conclusion: We conclude that finding ways to improve coordinated or integrated care for IPV and OUD is vital to outcomes for this population, and initiatives which support providers’ ability to work across different service contexts are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1625-1637
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Family Violence
Volume38
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Law
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

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