Big Ideas in Special Education Specially Designed Instruction, High-Leverage Practices, Explicit Instruction, and Intensive Instruction

Paul J. Riccomini, Stephanie Morano, Charles A. Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

After returning from the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) conference in Boston, five teachers were sharing information from the sessions they attended. Mrs. James, a special education teacher, attended multiple sessions emphasizing the importance of using “high-leverage practices” (HLPs) to become a more effective teacher. Mr. Franks, a general education teacher, and his co-teacher, Mrs. Fox, a special educator, attended sessions focused on how to intensify instruction for struggling students with disabilities through the use of “explicit instruction” (EI). Finally, Mrs. Arrow, the special education department chair, attended sessions on providing “specially designed instruction” (SDI) for students with disabilities. In addition, all five of the teachers mentioned that “intensive instruction” (II) was a term used in many of their sessions. As they shared information, it became clear to the group that they were unclear about the differences and similarities of these terms. They left their meeting with several important unanswered questions: Are HLPs, SDI, EI, and II the same thing? How are HLPs related to explicit instruction? If HLPs are used, does that mean SDI is being provided? Does using HLPs, such as EI, mean I am providing intensive instruction?.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)20-27
Number of pages8
JournalTeaching Exceptional Children
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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