Biological and Biosocial Theories: Integrating Findings from Neurobiology into Criminological Thought: Issues, Solutions, and Implications

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Over the past fifteen years, an explosion of research in the neurosciences has had direct implications for the study of criminology. Technological advancements, in particular, have led to significant increases in people's ability to provide a more integrated perspective in the field of criminology. Numerous behavioral science sub-disciplines, including molecular and behavioral genetics, neurobiology, physiology, psychology, cognitive neuroscience, endocrinology, and forensic psychiatry, provide substantial evidence that certain neurobiological functions contribute to an orientation toward the social environment that may increase risk for antisocial behavior. The field of criminology has concentrated on theories and concepts that revolve around experiential factors, whether they are system-wide, interpersonal, or individual. All fields of research are characterized by shortcomings and controversies, but some are uniquely targeted toward certain disciplines. When researchers from any discipline, including criminology, attempt to study criminal behavior, definitional problems often arise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Essential Criminology Reader
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages43-68
Number of pages26
ISBN (Electronic)9780429965142
ISBN (Print)0813343194, 9780429496592
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Social Sciences

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