Cold spells linked with respiratory disease hospitalization, length of hospital stay, and hospital expenses: Exploring cumulative and harvesting effects

Jin Feng, Dawei Cao, Dashan Zheng, Zhengmin (Min) Qian, Cunrui Huang, Huiqing Shen, Yi Liu, Qiyong Liu, Jimin Sun, Guangyuan Jiao, Xiaoran Yang, Stephen Edward McMillin, Chongjian Wang, Hualiang Lin, Xinri Zhang, Shiyu Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Previous studies have revealed the relationship between cold spells and morbidity and mortality due to respiratory diseases, while the detrimental effects of cold spells on the length of hospital stay and hospitalization expenses remain largely unknown. Methods: We collected hospitalization data for respiratory diseases in 11 cities of Shanxi, China during 2017–2019. In each case, exposure to meteorological variables and air pollution was estimated by the bilinear interpolation approach and inverse distance weighting method, respectively, and then averaged at the city level. Cold spells were defined as the daily mean temperature below the 10th, 7.5th, or 5th percentiles for at least 2 to 5 consecutive days. We applied distributed lag non-linear models combined with generalized additive models to assess cumulative effects and harvesting effects. Results: There were significant associations between cold spells and hospital admissions, length of hospital stay, and hospital expenses for respiratory diseases. Compared with the non-cold spell period, the overall (lag 0–21) cumulative risk of hospitalization for total respiratory diseases was 1.232 (95 % CI: 1.090, 1.394) on cold spell days, and the increased length of hospital stay and hospitalization expenses were 112.793 (95 % CI: 10.755, 214.830) days and 127.568 (95 % CI: 40.513, 214.624) thousand Chinese yuan. The overall cumulative risks of cold spells on total respiratory diseases and pneumonia were statistically significant. We further observed harvesting effects in the associations between cold spells and hospital admission, length of hospital stay, and hospitalization expenses for respiratory diseases. Conclusions: Cumulative cold-spell exposure for up to three weeks is associated with hospitalization, length of hospital stay, and hospital expenses for respiratory diseases. The observed harmful effects of cold spells on respiratory diseases can be partly attributable to harvesting effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number160726
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume863
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 10 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Cold spells linked with respiratory disease hospitalization, length of hospital stay, and hospital expenses: Exploring cumulative and harvesting effects'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this