Design for Inspectability: A Framework to Increase Inspectability of Additive Manufacturing Parts for Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Inspection Methods

Tobias Mahan, Lauren Katch, Andrea P. Arguelles, Jessica Menold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Additive manufacturing (AM) is used to produce load-bearing, safety-critical components in industries like aerospace, automotive, and medical devices. Designers can create AM components with complex internal features, organic topologies, and lattice structures to reduce part mass or part count. However, such complex features can make designs difficult or impossible to inspect using mature nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. Professional organizations suggest designers keep quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) in mind early in the design process. The Design for Inspectability (DfI) framework is suggested as a way of meeting the need for early-stage QA/QC considerations. This work presents a case study, where a group of designers considered one type of NDT, known as Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic (PEU) testing. Using heuristics derived from relevant literature, designers were able to create designs with increased inspectability. This improved inspectability came at the cost of other design objectives, however, such as strength and mass. This implies that certain design objectives may be inversely related to increased inspectability, raising significant concerns for the field. This work marks the first step toward mapping out the trade-offs between inspection and performance objectives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number072001
JournalJournal of Mechanical Design
Volume144
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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