Does closeness to God mediate the relationship between prayer and mental health in Christian, Jewish, and Muslim samples?

Benjamin Jeppsen, Stephanie Winkeljohn Black, Patrick Pössel, David H. Rosmarin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Most research in the psychology of religion does not account for interfaith differences. Many studies rely on predominately Christian samples with only a small representation of other faiths. Other studies focus solely on one religion without testing interfaith comparisons. Drawing from previous research in which closeness to God mediated the relationship between prayer and mental health in a predominately Christian sample, this study tested for mediation across three distinct religious samples: Christian, Jewish, and Muslim. Closeness to God mediated the relationship between prayer and mental health in the Christian and Muslim samples, but not in the Jewish sample. Prayer was consistently related to closeness to God, but closeness to God was not consistently related to mental health across the three samples. Implications for spiritually adapted therapies and future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-112
Number of pages14
JournalMental Health, Religion and Culture
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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