Durable Disadvantage: Gender and the Mark of Unauthorized Status in Immigrants’ Occupational Trajectories

A. Nicole Kreisberg, Margot Jackson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Adverse life course events associated with unemployment can negatively affect individuals’ future labor market prospects. Unauthorized status, and subsequent unauthorized employment, may operate similarly, marring immigrants’ labor market prospects even after they change legal status. However, it is unclear how and why any durable disadvantage associated with prior unauthorized status operates differently by gender. This is an important shortcoming, given that legal status and gender overlap to influence both migration and stratification. Using longitudinal data from a nationally representative sample of lawful permanent residents, we find durable disadvantage associated with prior exposure to unauthorized status, especially among women. Men with prior exposure to unauthorized status experience persistent occupational disadvantage over time relative to men who were never unauthorized. However, women with exposure to unauthorized status experience widening occupational disadvantage over time relative to women who were never unauthorized. Human capital and legal processes help to explain this pattern.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-172
Number of pages28
JournalSociological Perspectives
Volume66
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

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