Early Life Short-Term Exposure to Polychlorinated Biphenyl 126 in Mice Leads to Metabolic Dysfunction and Microbiota Changes in Adulthood

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Abstract

Early life exposure to environmental pollutants may have long-term consequences and harmful impacts on health later in life. Here, we investigated the short- and long-term impact of early life 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentacholorobiphenyl (PCB 126) exposure (24 μg/kg body weight for five days) in mice on the host and gut microbiota using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, metagenomics, and 1H NMR- and mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Induction of Cyp1a1, an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-responsive gene, was observed at 6 days and 13 weeks after PCB 126 exposure consistent with the long half-life of PCB 126. Early life, Short-Term PCB 126 exposure resulted in metabolic abnormalities in adulthood including changes in liver amino acid and nucleotide metabolism as well as bile acid metabolism and increased hepatic lipogenesis. Interestingly, early life PCB 126 exposure had a greater impact on bacteria in adulthood at the community structure, metabolic, and functional levels. This study provides evidence for an association between early life environmental pollutant exposure and increased risk of metabolic disorders later in life and suggests the microbiome is a key target of environmental chemical exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number8220
JournalInternational journal of molecular sciences
Volume23
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Catalysis
  • Molecular Biology
  • Spectroscopy
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry

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