ENVIRONMENTAL DISCOURSES ON SOIL DEGRADATION IN BOLIVIA: Sustainability and the search for socioenvironmental “middle ground”

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Beginning in the late 1970s various reports were sounding the alarm about worsening soil erosion in Bolivia, a landlocked and mostly mountainous republic of over 4 million people in central South America. Books such as Bolivia: The Despoiled Country by Walter Terrazas Urquidi (1974) and The Wasted Country: The Ecological Crisis in Bolivia by Mariano Baptista Gumucio (1977) alerted many Bolivians and Latin Americans to the country's grave dilemma. The widely read Losing Ground by North American Erik Eckholm (1976) introduced it to a still larger audience in the United States and Western Europe. Academic and governmental studies spelled out some of the serious consequences of Bolivia's erosion crisis (Grover 1974; LeBaron et al. 1979; Preston 1969). Accelerating erosion was degrading farm and range-land, forcing floods downstream, and leading to destructive desertification and dust storms. Bolivia's major newspapers regularly raised concerns that the country now suffers moderate to extreme loss of soils (Los Tiempos 1991; Presencia 1990).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationLiberation Ecologies
Subtitle of host publicationEnvironment, Development, Social Movements, Second Edition
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages98-114
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9781134382941
ISBN (Print)0415312353, 9780415312356
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Earth and Planetary Sciences
  • General Social Sciences

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