Erratum: A Decolonial Crip Linguistics (Applied Linguistics (2022) (amac042) DOI: 10.1093/applin/amac042)

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Abstract

This is a correction to: Suresh Canagarajah, A Decolonial Crip Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, 2022, amac042, https://doi.org/10.1093/applin/amac042 In the originally published version of this manuscript, there were several errors that have now been corrected: “Some deaf scholars have drawn from pragmatics and sociolinguistics to study the interactional strategies adopted by deaf people, especially those using different sign languages to talk to each other (see Green 2014; Friedner and Kusters 2015; Kusters 2021). Deaf scholars have also drawn attention to the limitations of a structuralist paradigm that values abstract grammatical features and classifications of representational systems, thus disregarding or colonizing signing practices that are interactional and embodied (Branson and Miller 2007; Hou and de Vos 2022)” was replaced with “Some deaf studies scholars have drawn from pragmatics and sociolinguistics to study the interactional strategies adopted by deaf people, especially those using different sign languages to talk to each other (see Green 2014; Friedner and Kusters 2015; Kusters 2021). Deaf studies scholars have also drawn attention to the limitations of a structuralist paradigm that values abstract grammatical features and classifications of representational systems, thus disregarding or colonizing signing practices that are interactional and embodied (Branson and Miller 2007; Hou and de Vos 2022). “Deaf scholars explain this moral orientation as a strong ethic of relationality and values relating to what is good and right about the outcomes” was replaced with “Deaf studies scholars explain this moral orientation as a strong ethic of relationality and values relating to what is good and right about the outcomes.” “Yergeau describes the communication of the autistic, a condition Yergeau themselves has been diagnosed with. The autistic are widely treated as asocial and, therefore, pre-rhetorical, as one is expected to have a sense of others in order to engage in persuasion, reasoning, or intentional communication. Yergeau demonstrates how even in situations where the utterances of the autistic are perceived as disruptive or incoherent because of their nonnormativity, there are diverse meanings motivating them and are interactively achieved” was replaced with “Yergeau describes the communication of autistic people, a condition Yergeau themselves has been diagnosed with. Autistic people are widely treated as asocial and, therefore, pre-rhetorical, as one is expected to have a sense of others in order to engage in persuasion, reasoning, or intentional communication. Yergeau demonstrates how even in situations where the utterances of autistic people are perceived as disruptive or incoherent because of their nonnormativity, there are diverse meanings motivating them and are interactively achieved.” “However, Melanie Yergeau (2017) gives a more radical example where every utterance might appear to lack context, coherence, or established indexicalities, thus disrupting communicative norms” was replaced with “However, M. Remi Yergeau (2018) gives a more radical example where every utterance might appear to lack context, coherence, or established indexicalities, thus disrupting communicative norms.”

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)606-607
Number of pages2
JournalApplied Linguistics
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication
  • Linguistics and Language

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