Grid resolution requirement for resolving rare and high intensity wall-shear stress events in direct numerical simulations

Xiang I.A. Yang, Jiarong Hong, Myoungkyu Lee, Xinyi L.D. Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Turbulent signals are intermittent with large instantaneous fluctuations. Such large fluctuations lead to small Kolmogorov scales that are hard to resolve in numerical simulations [P. K. Yeung, K. R. Sreenivasan, and S. B. Pope, Effects of finite spatial and temporal resolution in direct numerical simulations of incompressible isotropic turbulence, Phys. Rev. Fluids 3, 064603 (2018)2469-990X10.1103/PhysRevFluids.3.064603]. The present paper follows the above basic logic, but instead of dissipation events in isotropic turbulence, we study wall-shear stress events in plane channel flow. Wall-shear stress fluctuations are increasingly more intermittent as the Reynolds number increases. Hence, one has to employ higher grid resolutions as the Reynolds number increases in order to resolve a given percentage of wall-shear stress events. The objective of this paper is to quantify effects of the grid resolutions on the rare and high intensity wall-shear stress events. We find that the standard grid resolution resolves about 99% of the wall-shear stress events at Reτ=180. A slightly higher grid resolution has to be employed in order to resolve 99% of the wall-shear stress events at higher Reynolds numbers, and if the standard grid resolution is used for, e.g., a Reτ=10000 channel flow, one resolves about 90%-95% wall-shear stress events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number054603
JournalPhysical Review Fluids
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computational Mechanics
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes

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