Health and education concerns about returning to campus and online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic among US undergraduate STEM majors

Lindsay E. Palmer, Sherry L. Pagoto, Deja Workman, Kathrine A. Lewis, Lauren Rudin, Nina De Luna, Valeria Herrera, Nathanial Brown, Jessica Bibeau, Kaylei Arcangel, Molly E. Waring

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: We examined undergraduates’ concerns about returning to campus and online learning from home. Participants: Undergraduates majoring in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) at US universities/colleges. Methods: Participants completed an online survey in July 2020. We content-analyzed responses to open-ended questions about concerns about fall 2020. Results: Students (N = 64) were 52% women, 47% low socioeconomic status (SES), and 27% non-Hispanic white. Concerns about returning to campus included student noncompliance with university COVID-19 prevention guidelines (28%), infection risk (28%), poor instructional quality (26%), inadequate university plans for preventing/handling outbreaks (25%), negative impacts on social interactions (11%), and transportation/commuting (11%). Concerns about learning from home included difficulty focusing on schoolwork (58%), lack of hands-on/experiential learning (24%), negative impacts on social interactions (19%), family/home environment (15%), concerns that online learning wastes time/money (10%), and inadequate technology/Internet access (5%). Conclusions: Universities should address student concerns and provide resources to overcome barriers to effective learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2604-2611
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of American College Health
Volume71
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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