Human papillomavirus-associated cutaneous disease burden in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients: the role of human papillomavirus vaccination and a review of the literature

Lindsay C. Bacik, Catherine Chung

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is related to the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, oropharyngeal carcinoma, and anogenital malignancies. Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have impaired cell-mediated immunity, placing them at risk for more prolonged infection with a greater likelihood of disease expression. This presents important implications for screening and treatment of HPV in the HIV patient population. The use of prophylactic vaccines directed against HPV has been a promising clinical development, though the immunogenicity of these vaccines in the immunocompromised host and in patients with previously established HPV infections has not been well established. In this review, we describe the pathogenesis and epidemiology of HPV-related cutaneous malignancies in patients with HIV. We outline the current guidelines and recent advances in the field of HPV vaccination. It is our hope that increasing awareness of the HPV-related HIV comorbidities will lead to developments in preventative medicine capable of reducing the burden of these diseases. We recognize the importance of prevention as a primary defense against disease and hope that this article organizes and disseminates recent findings in the field of HPV-associated comorbidities in the HIV population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)627-634
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Dermatology
Volume57
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology

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