Identifying Tidal Disruption Events with an Expansion of the FLEET Machine-learning Algorithm

Sebastian Gomez, V. Ashley Villar, Edo Berger, Suvi Gezari, Sjoert van Velzen, Matt Nicholl, Peter K. Blanchard, Kate D. Alexander

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

We present an expansion of FLEET, a machine-learning algorithm optimized to select transients that are most likely tidal disruption events (TDEs). FLEET is based on a random forest algorithm trained on both the light curves and host galaxy information of 4779 spectroscopically classified transients. We find that for transients with a probability of being a TDE, P(TDE) > 0.5, we can successfully recover TDEs with ≈40% completeness and ≈30% purity when using their first 20 days of photometry or a similar completeness and ≈50% purity when including 40 days of photometry, an improvement of almost 2 orders of magnitude compared to random selection. Alternatively, we can recover TDEs with a maximum purity of ≈80% and a completeness of ≈30% when considering only transients with P(TDE) > 0.8. We explore the use of FLEET for future time-domain surveys such as the Legacy Survey of Space and Time on the Vera C. Rubin Observatory (Rubin) and the Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope (Roman). We estimate that ∼104 well-observed TDEs could be discovered every year by Rubin and ∼200 TDEs by Roman. Finally, we run FLEET on the TDEs from our Rubin survey simulation and find that we can recover ∼30% of them at redshift z < 0.5 with P(TDE) > 0.5, or ∼3000 TDEs yr-1 that FLEET could uncover from the Rubin stream. We have demonstrated that we will be able to run FLEET on Rubin photometry as soon as this survey begins. FLEET is provided as an open source package on GitHub: https://github.com/gmzsebastian/FLEET.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number113
JournalAstrophysical Journal
Volume949
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this