Impacting middle school students' science knowledge with problem-based learning simulations

Scott W. Brown, Kimberly A. Lawless, Mark A. Boyer, Greg Mullin, Mariya Yukhymenko, Andrew Cutter, Kamila Browdowinska Bruscianelli, Nicole Powell, Maria Fernada Enriquez, Jerry Rice, Gena Khodos

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Problem-based learning (PBL) simulations for middle school students, designed to promote a 21st century science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) skills. Using a web-based communications system and a PBL simulation in a research environment, GlobalEd 2 links classrooms of students who are separated by physical distance and socio-economic boundaries, with one another in an engaging and active game context as they play the role of international science advisors. This paper presents findings from a set of simulations (student n=535). Results indicate positive changes in students' knowledge about science content related to two different simulations - Water Resources and Climate Change. The implications of these results are discussed along with directions for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIADIS International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age, CELDA 2011
Pages181-187
Number of pages7
StatePublished - 2011
EventIADIS International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age, CELDA 2011 - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Duration: Nov 6 2011Nov 8 2011

Publication series

NameIADIS International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age, CELDA 2011

Conference

ConferenceIADIS International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age, CELDA 2011
Country/TerritoryBrazil
CityRio de Janeiro
Period11/6/1111/8/11

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Education

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Impacting middle school students' science knowledge with problem-based learning simulations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this