Inbred mouse strain differences in alcohol and nicotine addiction-related phenotypes from adolescence to adulthood

Laurel R. Seemiller, Sheree F. Logue, Thomas J. Gould

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Understanding the genetic basis of a predisposition for nicotine and alcohol use across the lifespan is important for public health efforts because genetic contributions may change with age. However, parsing apart subtle genetic contributions to complex human behaviors is a challenge. Animal models provide the opportunity to study the effects of genetic background and age on drug-related phenotypes, while controlling important experimental variables such as amount and timing of drug exposure. Addiction research in inbred, or isogenic, mouse lines has demonstrated genetic contributions to nicotine and alcohol abuse- and addiction-related behaviors. This review summarizes inbred mouse strain differences in alcohol and nicotine addiction-related phenotypes including voluntary consumption/self-administration, initial sensitivity to the drug as measured by sedative, hypothermic, and ataxic effects, locomotor effects, conditioned place preference or place aversion, drug metabolism, and severity of withdrawal symptoms. This review also discusses how these alcohol and nicotine addiction-related phenotypes change from adolescence to adulthood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number173429
JournalPharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior
Volume218
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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