Insomnia with objective, but not subjective, short sleep duration is associated with increased risk of incident hypertension: the Sleep Heart Health Study

Yanyuan Dai, Baixin Chen, Le Chen, Alexandros N. Vgontzas, Julio Fernandez-Mendoza, Maria Karataraki, Xiangdong Tang, Yun Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study Objectives: Insomnia with objective short sleep duration has been associated with higher risk of cardiometabolic morbidity. In this study, we examined the association between insomnia with objective short sleep duration, also based on subjective sleep duration, with incident hypertension in the Sleep Heart Health Study. Methods: We analyzed data from 1,413 participants free of hypertension or sleep apnea at baseline from the Sleep Heart Health Study, with a median follow-up duration of 5.1 years. Insomnia symptoms were defined based on difficulty falling asleep, difficulty returning to sleep, early morning awakening, or sleeping pill use more than half the days in a month. Objective short sleep duration was defined as polysomnography-measured total sleep time < 6 hours. Incident hypertension was defined based on blood pressure measures and/or use of antihypertensive medications at follow-up. Results: Individuals with insomnia who slept objectively < 6 hours had significantly higher odds of incident hypertension compared to normal sleepers who slept ≥ 6 hours (odds ratio = 2.00, 95% confidence interval = 1.09–3.65) or < 6 hours (odds ratio = 2.00, 95% confidence interval = 1.06–3.79) or individuals with insomnia who slept ≥ 6 hours (odds ratio = 2.79, 95% confidence interval = 1.24–6.30). Individuals with insomnia who slept ≥ 6 hours or normal sleepers who slept < 6 hours were not associated with increased risk of incident hypertension compared to normal sleepers who slept ≥ 6 hours. Finally, individuals with insomnia who self-reported sleeping < 6 hours were not associated with significantly increased odds of incident hypertension. Conclusions: These data further support that the insomnia with objective short sleep duration phenotype based on objective, but not subjective measures, is associated with increased risk of developing hypertension in adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1421-1428
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Volume19
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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