Just say no? Public attitudes about supportive and punitive policies to combat the opioid epidemic

Steven M. Sylvester, Simon F. Haeder, Timothy Callaghan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using an original demographically representative survey, we estimate the determinants of public support for a set of supportive and punitive policies to combat the opioid epidemic among a sample of 2,131 Americans. Our findings indicate that individuals who attribute blame for the epidemic to the personal choices of individuals, conservatives and those high in racial resentment are consistently more likely to support punitive policies to combat the opioid epidemic and less likely to favour policies to support individuals with substance use disorders. Individuals who have a personal connection to someone struggling with opioid use disorder favour policies to support such individuals but have nuanced attitudes towards punitive policies. Importantly, we find overwhelming support for all supportive policies except supervised injection sites, while roughly 50% of our sample supported the set of punitive policy choices. Our research represents a significant step forward toward understanding public opinion about the opioid epidemic and policies to combat it.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Public Policy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Administration
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Just say no? Public attitudes about supportive and punitive policies to combat the opioid epidemic'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this