Language Practices in Afro-Brazilian Religions: On Legitimacy, Oral Tradition, and Racial Issues

Cristine G. Severo, Ana Cláudia F. Eltermann, Sinfree Makoni

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter articulates and argues that language is a multilayered and intersemiotic sign with social and political and religious significance in Afro-Brazilian contexts. We argue that there is no way to imagine what counts as Brazil - and Brazilian languages - without reference to Africa and its cultural legacy and the impact of slavery on Brazil. We evoke a number of concepts in our analysis particularly the notions of Southern multilingualisms and pluriversality. We use both concepts to analyze how languages are used in African Brazilian religious practices, drawing on the ways people build both individual and collective religious experiences. The religious experiences involve a use and interpretation of language in creative and at times unpredictable ways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Routledge Handbook of Language and the Global South/s
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages202-212
Number of pages11
ISBN (Electronic)9781000600131
ISBN (Print)9780367440145
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Arts and Humanities
  • General Social Sciences

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