Minimally invasive hepatectomy is associated with decreased morbidity and resource utilization in the elderly

May C. Tee, Leo Chen, Devon Peightal, Jan Franko, Peter T. Kim, Rushin D. Brahmbhatt, Shankar Raman, Charles H. Scudamore, Stephen W. Chung, Maja Segedi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether elderly patients undergoing elective hepatectomy experience increased morbidity/mortality and whether these outcomes could be mitigated by minimally invasive hepatectomy (MIH). Methods: 15,612 patients from 2014 to 2017 were identified in the Hepatectomy Targeted Procedure Participant Use File of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Multivariable logistic regression models were constructed to examine the effect of elderly status (age ≥ 75 years, N = 1769) on outcomes with a subgroup analysis of elderly only patients by open (OH) versus MIH (robotic, laparoscopic, and hybrid, N = 4044). Propensity score matching was conducted comparing the effect of MIH to OH in elderly patients to ensure that results are not the artifact of imbalance in baseline characteristics. Results: Overall, elderly patients had increased risk for 30-day mortality, major morbidity, prolonged length of hospital stay, and discharge to destination other than home. In the elderly subgroup, MIH was associated with decreased major morbidity (OR 0.71, P = 0.031), invasive intervention (OR 0.61, P = 0.032), liver failure (OR 0.15, P = 0.011), bleeding (OR 0.46, P < 0.001), and prolonged length of stay (OR 0.46, P < 0.001). Propensity score-matched analyses successfully matched 4021 pairs of patients treated by MIH vs. OH, and logistic regression analyses on this matched sample found that MIH was associated with decreased major complications (OR 0.69, P = 0.023), liver failure (OR 0.14, P = 0.010), bile leak (OR 0.46, P = 0.009), bleeding requiring transfusion (OR 0.46, P < 0.001), prolonged length of stay (OR 0.46, P < 0.001), and discharge to destination other than home (OR 0.691, P = 0.035) compared to OH. Conclusion: MIH is associated with decreased risk of major morbidity, liver failure, bile leak, bleeding, prolonged length of stay, and discharge to destination other than home among elderly patients in this retrospective study. However, MIH in elderly patients does not protect against postoperative mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5030-5040
Number of pages11
JournalSurgical endoscopy
Volume34
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

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