New insights on faulting and intrusion processes during the June 2007, East Rift Zone eruption of Kīlauea volcano, Hawai'i

J. Leeburn, C. Wauthier, E. Montgomery-Brown, J. Gonzalez-Santana

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The East Rift Zone (ERZ) of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i, represents one of the most volcanically active regions in the world. The 2007 Father's Day (FD) dike intrusion, eruption, and accompanying slow-slip event (SSE) has been previously modeled using geodetic data to constrain the geometry of the intrusion and the timing and magnitude of the SSE. Here, we perform inversions of three interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) datasets and a new intensity offset tracking dataset to assess the effect of integrating intensity cross-correlation offsets into inversion problems and explore additional potential models for the intrusion geometry of the FD event based on this additional data. The overall lowest misfit single Okada model for all datasets opens 2.3 m, strikes 73 degrees while dipping sub-vertically at 83 degrees, and extends approximately 2.9 km to the ENE and 2.4 km downdip. The differences are minor between complex en-echelon distributed Okada and decollement model of (Montgomery-Brown et al., 2010) or 3D-MBEM breaching models including multiple surface breaches and free-slipping decollement movement. Finally, we examine the static Coulomb stress changes for the proposed decollement fault created by our preferred model and a representative model of deep rift opening and find that deep rift zones dilation, not shallow ERZ intrusions, are likely modulating slip on the decollement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number107425
JournalJournal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research
Volume421
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

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