Outcomes after aortic arch reconstruction for infants: Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest versus moderate hypothermia with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion

Igor A. Kornilov, Yuri S. Sinelnikov, Ilya A. Soinov, Dmitry N. Ponomarev, Marina S. Kshanovskaya, Aleksandra A. Krivoshapkina, Artem V. Gorbatykh, Alexander Y. Omelchenko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Optimal cerebral and visceral protection is crucial in aortic arch surgery. The main method for this protection has traditionally been deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA). Recently, antegrade cerebral perfusion with moderate hypothermia has become the preferred strategy for adult patients and some children undergoing aortic arch surgery. Continuous cerebral perfusion should reduce the incidence of neurological complications, but the degree of damage to organs and systems resulting from the lack of blood flow distal to the aortic arch remains unclear. Here, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of methods of protecting the brain and internal organs during aortic arch surgery in infants. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of 62 patients who underwent aortic arch reconstruction to assess their neurological status and internal injuries after different methods of cerebral protection. RESULTS: Surgical correction of aortic arch congenital abnormalities was performed under DHCA in 27 patients (Group I), and unilateral selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP) was performed in 35 patients (Group II). In Group I, 30.8% of patients had neurological complications, whereas in Group II 5.9% had neurological complications. The odds ratio for a neurological event was significantly lower in Group II compared with Group I-0.14 [(95% CI 0.02-0.63), P = 0.02]. However, incidence of renal dysfunction was significantly higher in the second group than the first: 21 (61.2%) vs 5 (19.2%) cases, respectively [odds ratio 6.49 (95% CI 1.41-38.26), P = 0.02]. CONCLUSIONS: Aortic arch reconstruction accompanied by SACP has a lower risk of neurological complications compared with DHCA. However, the high incidence of renal complications with SACP requires further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e45-e50
JournalEuropean Journal of Cardio-thoracic Surgery
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Outcomes after aortic arch reconstruction for infants: Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest versus moderate hypothermia with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this