Perceived Efficacy in Initiating Romantic Relationships and Single Emerging Adults’ Well-Being

Nicole K. Watkins, Jonathon J. Beckmeyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using data from 313 single emerging adults living in the United States, we explored initiation-efficacy (i.e., perceived abilities related to initiating romantic relationships) and if it was associated with well-being (life satisfaction, happiness with romantic experiences, and loneliness). Most participants indicated that it is not easy to ask someone out or tell someone they are interested in them and talking with someone they have feelings for is awkward. Initiation-efficacy was associated with well-being. Specifically, reporting that it is easy to ask someone out on a date was associated with greater life satisfaction and happiness with romantic experiences, but less loneliness. Further, emerging adults were lonelier when talking to someone they have feelings for was awkward. Finally, neither relationship desire or dismissal moderated associations between initiation-efficacy and well-being. However, relationship dismissal was associated with greater life satisfaction and happiness with romantic experiences and relationship desire was associated with more loneliness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)972-978
Number of pages7
JournalEmerging Adulthood
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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