Potential risk to pollinators from neonicotinoid applications to host trees for management of spotted lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae)

Jonathan Elmquist, David Biddinger, Ngoc T. Phan, Timothy W. Moural, Fang Zhu, Kelli Hoover

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Neonicotinoid insecticides are used to manage spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula (White); hereafter SLF), a recently introduced pest in the United States. Neonicotinoids can harm nontargets, such as pollinators potentially exposed via floral resources of treated plants. We quantified neonicotinoid residues in whole flowers of two SLF host plant species, red maple (Acer rubrum L. [Sapindales: Sapindaceae]) and tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) [Sapindales: Simaroubaceae]), treated with post-bloom imidacloprid or dinotefuran applications that differed in timing and method of application. In red maple flowers, dinotefuran residues from fall applications were significantly higher than summer applications, while imidacloprid residues from fall applications were significantly lower than summer applications. Residues did not differ between application methods or sites. In tree-of-heaven flowers, dinotefuran residues were only detected in one of 28 samples at a very low concentration. To assess acute mortality risk to bees from oral exposure to residues in these flowers, we calculated risk quotients (RQ) using mean and 95% prediction interval residue concentrations from treatments in this study and lethal concentrations obtained from acute oral bioassays for Apis mellifera (L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae)) and Osmia cornifrons (Radoszkowski (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae)), then compared these RQs to a level of concern. For A. mellifera, only one treatment group, applied at 2X maximum label rate, had an RQ that exceeded this level. However, several RQs for O. cornifrons exceeded the level of concern, suggesting potential acute risk to solitary bees. Further studies are recommended for more comprehensive risk assessments to nontargets from neonicotinoid use for SLF management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)368-378
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of economic entomology
Volume116
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Medicine

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