Prevalence of Psychiatric Comorbidities in Patients With Neurofibromatosis

Kanwarjeet Singh Brar, Chintan Trivedi, Navdeep Kaur, Mahwish Adnan, Hiren Patel, Uzma Beg, Mustafa Qureshi, Zeeshan Mansuri, Aalamgeer Ibrahim, Muhammad K. Zafar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To assess the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in patients with neurofibromatosis. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we used the 2010–2014 National Inpatient Sample database. Patients ≥ 18 years of age with a primary or secondary diagnosis of neurofibromatosis and psychiatric comorbidities were queried. Results: A total of 43,270 patients with a mean age of 48.7 years (female: 55.7%, White: 70.1%) were included in the study. Overall, psychiatric comorbidities were present in 46.5% of patients; mood disorders (22.1%) and anxiety disorders (12.2%) were the most prevalent comorbidities. Although previous studies report prevalence rates of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in up to 50% of patients with neurofibromatosis, our study found that the rate was much lower at 1.10%. Female sex and non-White race were less associated with psychiatric comorbidities (odds ratio = 0.868 [P = .003] and 0.689 [P < .001], respectively). The moderate-to-extreme loss of function illness severity category was associated with 1.35-times higher odds of having psychiatric comorbidities compared to mild-to-moderate or no loss of function (P < .001). The total length of stay was similar in patients with and without psychiatric comorbidities (mean = 4.98 [95% CI, 4.72–5.24] vs mean = 4.83 [95% CI, 4.60–5.07], respectively; P = .34). Conclusions: In adult patients with neurofibromatosis, 46.5% were found to have at least one psychiatric comorbid diagnosis. The most frequent psychiatric comorbid disorders were mood disorders and anxiety disorders. Female sex and non-White race predicted a lower likelihood of having a psychiatric disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number23m03514
JournalPrimary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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