*Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Advanced Science and Mathematics Achievement During Elementary School

Paul L. Morgan, Eric Hengyu Hu, George Farkas, Marianne M. Hillemeier, Yoonkyung Oh, Cecelia A. Gloski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

We analyzed a population-based cohort (N = 10,922) to investigate the onset and stability of racial and ethnic disparities in advanced (i.e., above the 90th percentile) science and mathematics achievement during elementary school as well as the antecedent, opportunity, and propensity factors that explained these disparities. About 13% to 16% of White students versus 3% to 4% of Black or Hispanic students displayed advanced science or mathematics achievement during kindergarten. The antecedent factor of family socioeconomic status and the propensity factors of student science, mathematics, and reading achievement by kindergarten consistently explained whether students displayed advanced science or mathematics achievement during first, second, third, fourth, or fifth grade. These and additional factors substantially or fully explained initially observed disparities between Black or Hispanic and White students in advanced science or mathematics achievement during elementary school. Economic and educational policies designed to increase racial and ethnic representation in STEM course taking, degree completion, and workforce participation may need to begin by elementary school.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-172
Number of pages22
JournalGifted Child Quarterly
Volume67
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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