Resource Utilization Following Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography and Stress Echocardiography in Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department With Chest Pain

Adam Sturts, Mohammed Ruzieh, Sanket S. Dhruva, Brandon Peterson, John M. Mandrola, Guodong Liu, Rita F. Redberg, Andrew J. Foy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study aimed to assess long-term resource utilization and outcomes in patients with acute chest pain who underwent coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and stress echocardiography (SE). This was a retrospective, propensity-matched analysis of health insurance claims data for a national sample of privately insured patients over the period January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2014. There were 3,816 patients matched 1:1 who received either CCTA (n = 1,908) or SE (n = 1,908). Patients were seen in the emergency department (ED) between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2011 with a primary diagnosis of chest pain and received either CCTA or SE within 72 hours as the first noninvasive test and maintained continuous enrollment in the database from the time of the ED encounter through December 31, 2014. All individual patient data were censored at 3 years. Compared with SE, CCTA was associated with higher odds of downstream cardiac catheterization (9.9% vs 7.7%, adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00 to 1.63), future noninvasive testing (27.7% vs 22.3%, AOR 1.22, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.42), and return ED visits or hospitalization for chest pain at 3 years (33.1% vs 24.2%, AOR 1.37, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.59). There were no statistically significant differences in new statin use (15.5% vs 14.9%, AOR 1.04, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.28), coronary revascularization (2.7% vs 2.2%, AOR 1.25, 95% CI 0.77 to 2.01) or hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction (0.9% vs 0.9%, AOR 0.96, 95% CI 0.47 to 1.99). In conclusion, in patients who present to the ED with chest pain, CCTA is associated with increased downstream resource utilization compared with SE with no differences in long-term cardiovascular outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8-12
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume163
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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