Risk factors for head and neck cancer in more and less developed countries: Analysis from the INHANCE consortium

Neerav Goyal, Max Hennessy, Erik Lehman, Wenxue Lin, Antonio Agudo, Wolfgang Ahrens, Stefania Boccia, Paul Brennan, Hermann Brenner, Gabriella Cadoni, Cristina Canova, Chu Chen, David Conway, Maria Paula Curado, Luigino Dal Maso, Alexander W. Daudt, Valeria Edefonti, Eleonora Fabianova, Leticia Fernandez, Silvia FranceschiWerner Garavello, Maura Gillison, Richard B. Hayes, Claire Healy, Rolando Herrero, Ivana Holcatova, Jossy L. Kanda, Karl Kelsey, Bo T Hansen, Rosalina Koifman, Pagona Lagiou, Carlo La Vecchia, Fabio Levi, Guojun Li, Jolanta Lissowska, Rossana Mendoza López, Danièle Luce, Gary Macfarlane, Dana Mates, Keitaro Matsuo, Michael McClean, Ana Menezes, Gwenn Menvielle, Hal Morgenstern, Kirsten Moysich, Eva Negri, Andrew F. Olshan, Tamas Pandics, Jerry Polesel, Mark Purdue, Loredana Radoi, Heribert Ramroth, Lorenzo Richiardi, Stimson Schantz, Stephen M. Schwartz, Diego Serraino, Oxana Shangina, Elaine Smith, Erich M. Sturgis, Beata Świątkowska, Peter Thomson, Thomas L. Vaughan, Marta Vilensky, Deborah M. Winn, Victor Wunsch-Filho, Guo Pei Yu, Jose P. Zevallos, Zuo Feng Zhang, Tongzhang Zheng, Ariana Znaor, Paolo Boffetta, Mia Hashibe, Yuan Chin A. Lee, Joshua E. Muscat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: We analyzed the pooled case-control data from the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium to compare cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption risk factors for head and neck cancer between less developed and more developed countries. Subjects and Methods: The location of each study was categorized as either a less developed or more developed country. We compared the risk of overall head and neck cancer and cancer of specific anatomic subsites associated with cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption. Additionally, age and sex distribution between categories was compared. Results: The odds ratios for head and neck cancer sites associated with smoking duration differed between less developed and more developed countries. Smoking greater than 20 years conferred a higher risk for oral cavity and laryngeal cancer in more developed countries, whereas the risk was greater for oropharynx and hypopharynx cancer in less developed countries. Alcohol consumed for more than 20 years conferred a higher risk for oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx cancer in less developed countries. The proportion of cases that were young (<45 years) or female differed by country type for some HNC subsites. Conclusion: These findings suggest the degree of industrialization and economic development affects the relationship between smoking and alcohol with head and neck cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1565-1578
Number of pages14
JournalOral Diseases
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • General Dentistry

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