Short-term high-fat diet consumption increases body weight and body adiposity and alters brain stem taste information processing in rats

Andras Hajnal, Peter Kovacs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Diet-induced obesity is known to develop whether exposed to a high-energy diet (HED) or a high-fat diet (HFD). However, it is still not clear whether the elevated energy content or the macronutrient imbalance is the key factor in early disease progression. Therefore, this study compared the short-term effects of 2 widely used rodent obesogenic diets, an HFD with 60 kcal% fat content and a carbohydrate-based HED, on the body weight, body fat content, glucose tolerance, and neuronal taste responses in rats. We found that only HFD induced an early significant body weight increase compared with the control normal diet (ND) group, starting on week 4, and resulting in a significantly elevated body adiposity compared with both the ND and HED groups. Oral glucose tolerance test revealed no difference across groups. Subsequently, we also found that HFD resulted in a significant body weight gain even under energy-restricted (isocaloric to ND) conditions. In vivo electrophysiological recordings revealed that only the ad libitum HFD and not the isocaloric-HFD altered the brain stem gustatory neural responses to oral taste stimulation. In conclusion, this study showed that increased fat intake might result in significant body weight gain even under isocaloric and metabolically healthy conditions and demonstrated changes in central taste processing in an early stage of dietary obesity. A better understanding of these initial physiological changes may offer new drug targets for preventing obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberbjac020
JournalChemical senses
Volume47
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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