Social Support Coping for African American Adolescents: Effect of a Culturally Grounded Randomized Controlled Trial Intervention

W. La Vome Robinson, Christopher R. Whipple, Leonard A. Jason, Cori Cafaro, Sally Lemke, Kate Keenan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The effect of the Adapted-Coping with Stress (A-CWS) intervention on social support coping was examined, using a randomized controlled trial design. The participants were 410 ninth-grade students (ages 14 to 16 years and mostly African American) living in low-resourced neighborhoods. Participants were randomly assigned 1:1 to either the A-CWS intervention or a standard care control condition. All participants were assessed at their schools before implementation of the intervention, at intervention completion, and again at 6- and 12-month post-intervention. Engagement in social support coping was examined in both intention-to-treat and treatment-as-received samples (i.e., intervention participants who attended at least 12 A-CWS treatment sessions and participants in the standard care control condition), using latent growth models. In intention-to-treat analyses, no significant treatment effects were identified. In treatment-as-received analyses, results revealed a significant association between social support coping and treatment condition; levels of social support coping decreased over time in the control condition, but they remained relatively stable in the treatment condition. The results indicate adequate intervention adherence and efficacy of the A-CWS to sustain social support coping within a sample of youth at high risk for stress exposure and associated disorders. Clinical Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)715-727
Number of pages13
JournalPrevention Science
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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