Social Vulnerability Is Associated with Poorer Outcomes in Preschool Children With Recurrent Wheezing Despite Standardized and Supervised Medical Care

Abby D. Mutic, David T. Mauger, Jocelyn R. Grunwell, Cydney Opolka, Anne M. Fitzpatrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Social determinants of health are associated with disparate asthma outcomes in school-age children. Social determinants have not been studied in preschool children with recurrent wheezing. Objective: We hypothesized that preschool children with recurrent wheezing at highest risk of social vulnerability would have more frequent symptoms and exacerbations when followed over 1 year, despite receiving standardized and supervised asthma care. Methods: A multicenter population of adherent preschool children receiving standardized and supervised care for wheezing was stratified by a composite measure of social vulnerability based on individual-level variables. Primary outcomes included days with upper respiratory infections and days with asthma symptom flares. Other outcomes included symptom scores during upper respiratory infections and respiratory symptom flare days, exacerbation occurrence, quality of life during the exacerbation, and hospitalization. Results: Preschool children at highest risk of social vulnerability did not have more frequent upper respiratory infections, respiratory symptoms, or exacerbations, but instead had more severe symptoms during upper respiratory infections and respiratory flare days, as well as more severe exacerbations with significantly poorer caregiver quality of life. Children at highest risk of social vulnerability also lived in poorer housing conditions with differing exposures and self-reported triggers. Conclusions: Individual-level social determinants of health reflecting social vulnerability are associated with poorer outcomes in preschool children with recurrent wheezing despite access to supervised and standardized care. Comprehensive assessment of social determinants of health is warranted in even the youngest children with wheezing, because mitigation of these social inequities is an essential first step toward improving outcomes in pediatric patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)994-1002
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Social Vulnerability Is Associated with Poorer Outcomes in Preschool Children With Recurrent Wheezing Despite Standardized and Supervised Medical Care'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this