StandUPTV: Preparation and optimization phases of a mHealth intervention to reduce sedentary screen time in adults

Sarah Keadle, Kristina Hasanaj, Krista Leonard-Corzo, Alexander Tolas, Rachel Crosley-Lyons, Bjorn Pfisterer, Maria Legato, Arlene Fernandez, Emily Lowell, Kevin Hollingshead, Tsung Yen Yu, Suzanne Phelan, Siobhan M. Phillips, Nicole Watson, Todd Hagobian, Kate Guastaferro, Matthew P. Buman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Recreational sedentary screen time (rSST) is the most prevalent sedentary behavior for adults outside of work, school, and sleep, and is strongly linked to poor health. StandUPTV is a mHealth trial that uses the Multiphase Optimization Strategy (MOST) framework to develop and evaluate the efficacy of three theory-based strategies for reducing rSST among adults. This paper describes the preparation and optimization phases of StandUPTV within the MOST framework. We identified three candidate components based on previous literature: (a) rSST electronic lockout (LOCKOUT), which restricts rSST through electronic means; (b) adaptive prompts (TEXT), which provides adaptive prompts based on rSST behaviors; and (c) earning rSST through increased moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) participation (EARN). We also describe the mHealth iterative design process and the selection of an optimization objective. Finally, we describe the protocol of the optimization randomized controlled trial using a 23 factorial experimental design. We will enroll 240 individuals aged 23–64 y who engage in >3 h/day of rSST. All participants will receive a target to reduce rSST by 50% and be randomized to one of 8 combinations representing all components and component levels: LOCKOUT (yes vs. no), TEXT (yes vs. no), and EARN (yes vs. no). Results will support the selection of the components for the intervention package that meet the optimization objective and are acceptable to participants. The optimized intervention will be tested in a future evaluation randomized trial to examine reductions in rSST on health outcomes among adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number107402
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials
Volume136
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2024

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)

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