Symptomatic Infection with Vairimorpha spp. Decreases Diapause Survival in a Wild Bumble Bee Species (Bombus griseocollis)

Margarita Orlova, Monique Porter, Heather M. Hines, Etya Amsalem

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Vairimorpha, a microsporidian parasite (previously classified as Nosema), has been implicated in the decline of wild bumble bee species in North America. Previous studies examining its influence on colony performance have displayed variable results, from extremely detrimental effects to no observable influence, and little is known about the effects it has on individuals during the winter diapause, a bottleneck for survival in many annual pollinators. Here, we examined the effect of Vairimorpha infection, body size, and mass on diapause survival in Bombus griseocollis gynes. We demonstrate that gyne survival length in diapause is negatively affected by symptomatic Vairimorpha infection of the maternal colony but does not correlate with individual pathogen load. Our findings further indicate that increased body mass offers a protective effect against mortality during diapause in infected, but not in healthy, gynes. This suggests that access to adequate nutritional resources prior to diapause might offset the harmful effect of Vairimorpha infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1656
JournalAnimals
Volume13
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • General Veterinary

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