The comparison of serratus anterior plane block versus intercostal block for postoperative analgesia following thoracotomy surgery

Gözen Öksüz, Muhammed Sayan, Mahmut Arslan, Aykut Urfalioglu, Hafize Öksüz, Bora Bilal, Oya Yalçin Çok

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Pain after thoracotomy is one of the most severe pain experienced by the patients. Intercostal nerve block (IB) is one of the most commonly used methods of pain management after thoracotomy operations. Serratus anterior plane block (SAPB) is a novel block that has been shown to be effective for pain management in thoracic surgery. In this study, we aimed to compare the postoperative visual pain scores (VAS) and analgesic consumption following serratus anterior plane block or intercostal nevre block in patients undergoing thoracic surgery. Method: Patients who underwent thoracotomy operation in our clinic between May 2016 and May 2017 were reviewed retrospectively. Demographic data, postoperative analgesic consumptions and complications were evaluated. Results: Data of 42 patients undergoing thoracotomy operation were obtained. Twenty two patients were performed with IB and 20 patients were performed with SAPB. When the two groups were compared, age, gender, weight, height, duration of operation were similar. VAS scores at postoperative 1st, 2nd, 4th, 6th, 12th and 24th hours were found to be significantly lower in the SAPB group (p <0.001). There was no significant difference in complications in both groups. Conclusion: As a result of this study, SAPB for postoperative analgesia following thoracic surgery was superior to IB.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)223-228
Number of pages6
JournalAnestezi Dergisi
Volume26
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The comparison of serratus anterior plane block versus intercostal block for postoperative analgesia following thoracotomy surgery'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this