The impact of perceived stress and perceived control on anxiety and mood disorders in noncardiac chest pain

Diane L. Rosenbaum, Kamila S. White, Ernest V. Gervino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chest pain without detectable heart disease, noncardiac chest pain (NCCP), is linked with anxiety and depression. Theory posits stress and perceived control may relate to NCCP. We hypothesized stress would have direct and mediated effects via perceived control on anxiety and mood disorders in NCCP. Patients (N = 113) completed questionnaires and a structured diagnostic interview. Stress and perceived control were associated with anxiety and mood disorder severity. Perceived control fully mediated the relation between stress and mood disorder severity but not anxiety disorder severity. Results are partially supportive of anxiety-based theories of NCCP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1183-1192
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume17
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

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