The importance of parent self-regulation and parent–child coregulation in research on parental discipline

Erika Lunkenheimer, Melissa L. Sturge-Apple, Madison R. Kelm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Parent self-regulation (PSR) is multifaceted, involving emotional, cognitive, and biological processes that support or constrain parenting behavior. It is highly relevant to disciplinary contexts in which parents' regulatory difficulties can contribute to harsh discipline, which is linked to children's maladjustment. In this article, we address why parents' self-regulation is an essential focus for basic and applied research on parental discipline. We emphasize the need to (1) incorporate and test multiple domains of PSR to understand their respective and interactive contributions and (2) understand how PSR interfaces with parent–child coregulation in delineating mechanistic pathways of the effects of harsh discipline on children's adjustment. These foci will more fully inform the etiology of children's maladjustment related to harsh discipline and knowledge regarding specific, malleable intervention targets aimed at reducing harsh discipline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-31
Number of pages7
JournalChild Development Perspectives
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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